February is the Month of LOVE…

You can do all the dating you want, but if your conscious mind has a different agenda to your unconscious mind, you will not find what you are truly looking for. Oh, and we might add, you may not recognize Mr or Mrs Right in front of you because of past relationship issues that hinder your love success.

This program was developed by myself, Georgia Foster, an author, leading therapist and speaker and Suzy Greaves, Editor of Psychologies Magazine, who has also been hailed by the Daily Mail as ‘the top ten guru to change your life around’.

Together, we share many relationship experiences personally, so they get the ‘single’ side of life and know the on-going frustration of finding Mr Right.

Collectively, we have been in the self-help industry since 1995 learning pioneering techniques in human nature and how we think, feel and behave in ways that can hold us back when it comes to love.

More importantly, mine and Suzy’s backgrounds have elevated our individual training’s, results based approach and client outcomes to give you the best in changing your thinking about love and relationships.

The Cracking the Love Code program will train your brain for love. You will use easy meditation tools and channel your thoughts in order to enter a state of deep hypnosis, allowing you to re-program your thinking and learn how to attract a healthy relationship into your life.

You will discover

What is not working in dating and find a new way that does work

  • How to re-train your thinking
  • What your unique love personality is
  • How you can improve your love life
  • How to let go
  • How to change your childhood conditioning
  • What is really important in love
  • Where you can improve your love life and dating potential

If this isn’t for you then maybe you know someone who could really benefit?

Check Out the Program Here

 

Hair salon enlists counsellor as clients emotional issues spill over to staff

A MELBOURNE hair salon has brought in a counsellor to help its staff cope when their clients offload their often troubling or distressing life stories.

Melbourne salon owner Lauren MacKellin has taken the big step of hiring a counsellor so staff can deal with some ‘over-sharing’ from clients.

RECOGNISING her customers pour their hearts out to her staff on a daily basis, Melbourne hair salon owner Lauren MacKellin is enlisting her staff into a counselling course on how to manage the emotional needs of her clientele.

The Vision Blonde salon owner has decided to take action, sending her staff to a course on how to deal with others’ problems.

“Every day my staff are taking on my clients’ problems and each day is an emotional rollercoaster for them,” says Lauren.

“What my staff need is a hand in how to effectively help, to know how to nurture our clients’ emotional needs along with their own.”

Hairdressers and their clients share a very close and trusting relationship, and thanks to social media, social interaction with your hairdresser is now becoming even more valuable.

“At the end of the day, my employees are as important to my business as my clients, and I need to look after the needs of both. It’s not just about the needs of their hair”.

According to clinical psychologist Georgia Foster, being in “the chair” while someone is nurturing you not only makes you look better, but it also makes you feel good.

Counsellor and hypnotherapist Georgia Foster

Counsellor and hypnotherapist Georgia Foster 

And the mind enjoys the attention; off-loading can be a way to release tension with someone who is not in their everyday life.

“A hairdresser, like any other profession that involves a one-on-one interaction, can often trigger burnout due to the demands of being a ‘free therapist’,” says Georgia.

“The best strategy is to find ways to ‘brush off’ clients’ problems by taking proper breaks when possible, going off-site or after work, finding ways to break the state such as a big walk or an exercise class.

“Any profession where you are one-on-one for a period time similar to a hairdresser can have client burnout too, such as beauty therapists, massage therapists, chiropractors, pilates and yoga teachers.

The Blonde Vision salon in Melbourne

The Blonde Vision salon in Melbourne

“They all – to a certain extent – have to expect some level of being a ‘friendly’ therapist, but equally need know when to stand back and not take on board too much.”

Georgia really commends Lauren for her efforts as an employer in contacting her to counsel her staff over Skype.

“Employers need to put in place tools and strategies that give staff the right communication to know when and what to say, and when to retreat or change subjects,” adds Georgie.

“It’s important that when the staff feel supported, the domino effect means the client is happier too.”

A few helpful tips from Georgia:

  • Listen and be non-judgmental
  • Don’t act surprised if you hear anything that shocks you
  • Let them know you are not a qualified counsellor and suggest an appropriate support system
  • Never commit suggesting a way forward, as you are not trained
  • Encourage outside stress management tools such as a yoga class or meditation class
  • Find a worse story to talk about that makes them become more grateful
  • Try and turn a positive spin on the situation
  • Find funny things to talk about that breaks their emotional state

 

Full Story Here

Giving up alcohol opened my eyes to the infuriating truth about why women drink

I’m newly sober and dog-paddling through the booze all around me. It’s summer, and Whole Foods has planted rosé throughout the store. Rosé is great with fish! And strawberries! And vegan protein powder! (Okay, I made that last one up.) At the office, every desk near mine has a bottle of wine or liquor on it in case people are too lazy to walk the 50 feet to one of the well-stocked communal bars we’ve built on our floor. Driving home from work, I pass billboard ads for Fluffed Marshmallow Smirnoff and Iced Cake Smirnoff and not just Cinnamon, but Cinnamon ChurrosSmirnoff. A local pharmacy, the same one that fucks up my prescription three months in a row, installs self-service beer taps and young men line up with their empty growlers all the way back to Eye & Ear Care.

Traveling for work, I steel myself for the company-sponsored wine tasting. Skipping it is not an option. My plan is to work the room with my soda and lime, make sure I’m seen by the five people who care about these things, and leave before things get sloppy (which they always do). Six wines and four beers are on display at the catering stand. I ask for club soda and get a blank look. Just water, then? The bartender grimaces apologetically. “I think there’s a water fountain in the lobby?” she says.

There is. But it’s broken. I mingle empty-handed for 15 minutes, fending off well-meaning offers to get me something from the bar. After the fifth, I realize I’m going to cry if one more person offers me alcohol. I leave and cry anyway. Later I order vanilla ice cream from room service to cheer myself up.

“People love this with a shot of bourbon poured over it,” the person taking my order says. “Any interest in treating yourself?”

That’s the summer I realize that everyone around me is tanked. But it also dawns on me that the women are super double tanked — that to be a modern, urbane woman means to be a serious drinker. This isn’t a new idea — just ask the Sex and the City girls (or the flappers). A woman with a single malt scotch is bold and discerning and might fire you from her life if you fuck with her. A woman with a PBR is a Cool Girl who will not be shamed for belching. A woman drinking MommyJuice wine is saying she’s more than the unpaid labor she gave birth to. The things women drink are signifiers for free time and self-care and conversation — you know, luxuries we can’t afford. How did you not see this before? I ask myself. You were too hammered, I answer back. That summer I see, though. I see that booze is the oil in our motors, the thing that keeps us purring when we should be making other kinds of noise

One day that summer I’m wearing unwise (but cute, so cute) shoes and trip at the farmer’s market, cracking my phone, blood-staining the knees of my favorite jeans, and scraping both my palms. Naturally, I post about it on Facebook as soon as I’ve dusted myself off. Three women who don’t know I’m sober comment quickly:

“Wine. Immediately.” 

“Do they sell wine there?” 

“Definitely wine. And maybe new shoes.”

Have I mentioned that it’s morning when this happens? On a weekday? This isn’t one of those nightclub farmer’s markets. And the women aren’t the kind of beleaguered, downtrodden creatures you imagine drinking to get through the day. They’re pretty cool chicks, the kind people ridicule for having First World Problems. Why do they need to drink?

Well, maybe because even cool chicks are still women. And there’s no easy way to be a woman, because, as you may have noticed, there’s no acceptable way to be a woman. And if there’s no acceptable way to be the thing you are, then maybe you drink a little. Or a lot.

The year before I get sober, I’m asked to be The Woman on a panel at the company where I work. (That was literally the pitch: “We need one woman.”) Three guys and me, talking to summer interns about company culture. There are two female interns in the audience, and when it’s time for questions, one says:

“I’ve heard this can be a tough place for women to succeed. Can you talk about what it’s been like for you?”

As The Woman, I assume for some reason that the question is directed at me. “If you’re tough and persistent and thick-skinned, you’ll find your way,” I say. “I have.”

I don’t say she’ll have to work around interruptions and invisibility and micro-aggressions and a scarcity of role models and a lifetime of her own conditioning. My job on this panel is to make this place sound good, so I leave some stuff out. Particularly the fact that I’m drinking at least one bottle of wine a night to dissolve the day off of me.

But she’s a woman. She probably learned to read between the lines before she could read the lines themselves. She thanks me and sits down.

“I disagree,” says the guy sitting next to me. “I think this is a great company for women.”

My jaw gently opens on its own.

The guy next to him nods. “Absolutely,” he said. “I have two women on my team and they get along great with everyone.”

Of course they do, I think but don’t say. It’s called camouflage.

Guy #1 continues. “There’s a woman on my team who had a baby last year. She went on maternity leave and came back, and she’s doing fine. We’re very supportive of moms.”

Guy #3 jumps in just to make sure we have 100% male coverage on the topic. “The thing about this place,” he says, “is it’s a meritocracy. And merit is gender-blind.” He smiles at me and I stare back. Silent balefulness is all I have to offer, but his smile wavers so I know I’ve pierced some level of smug.

The panel organizer and I fume afterward. “Those fucking fucks,” she says. “Ratfucks.”

 

by Kristi Coulter